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ALWAYS CLEVER AND BEAUTIFULLY PRODUCED VISUAL COMMENTARY

Print Version

RICHARD MEROS SALUTES THE SOUTHERN MAN
Adapted from the book by Richard Meros, by Geoff Pinfield and Arthur Meek
Performed by Arthur Meek
Directed by Geoff Pinfield

at BATS Theatre, 1 Kent Tce, Wellington
From 8 Mar 2012 to 17 Mar 2012
[1 hr]

Reviewed by Laurie Atkinson, 12 Mar 2012
originally published in The Dominion Post

With Richard Meros Salutes the Southern Man we are attending a slick and funny Power Point lecture that salutes our mythical taciturn hero and if you stay the full course of just one hour you'll end up buying one of Richard Meros's books and earning a NZQA Level 3 Unit Standard as well as two FlyBuy points.

A large screen, a couple rocks of schist and some tussock are the simple set. The projections are even better than when Richard Meros lectured us on wanting to be Helen Clarke's lover; they are an often bitingly witty and an always clever and beautifully produced visual commentary on contemporaryNew Zealand. 

The speech also throws amusing darts at such sacred cows as Creative New Zealand, David Bain, John Key and the rest of the usual suspects, not to mention the whole business/corporate rigmarole of snappy, easy solutions to Herculean problems that need solving. 

The enthusiastic researcher, Richard Meros (Arthur Meek), who did most of his in-depth research in the Miramar Public Library, rouses our interest in his quest for our very own Hercules, the saviour of the world who has the answers to climate change, over population and the global financial crisis.

If you can't get a seat for the Bats season then don't worry as he's returning later in the year to Downstage.  

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See also reviews by:
 John Smythe
 Ryan Brown-Haysom (Salient);
 Lynn Freeman (Capital Times);
 Terry MacTavish
 Reynald Castaneda
 Rosabel Tan
 Richard Howard
 Sarah Dunn (Nelson Mail);
 Helen Sims